On June 13, 2019, Transport Minister Marc Garneau officially announced that the use of electronic logging devices (ELDs) will be mandatory for federally regulated commercial vehicle operators in Canada. Similar regulations have already been in place in the United States since December 18, 2017. Here is a brief overview of what you need to know about the Canadian regulations to be well prepared.

What is an ELD?

An ELD is a tamper-resistant device synced with a vehicle’s engine that electronically records the operation dates and times of a commercial vehicle. It allows you to know when and for how long a vehicle is travelling to ensure that drivers respect their daily limit and accurately log their working hours.

Why make the use of ELDs mandatory?

According to Transport Canada, the regulation will improve road safety for all road users. Knowing that driver fatigue is still an issue, the mandatory use of ELDs could reduce the risk of fatigue-related collisions by approximately 10%. The Saskatchewan Coroners Service had also recommended the use of ELDs following the collision involving the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team in April 2018.

In addition to improving security, ELDs will save carriers time and money due to the administrative burden of paper logs. They will help carriers comply with the Hours of Service Regulations and reduce the impacts of non-compliance.

The objective of using ELDs is also to promote and ensure fair competition for Canadian carriers. Tamper-proof devices will require everyone to follow regulations in the same way.

Who must comply?

The new rules apply to federally regulated carriers, which means nearly 157,500 commercial vehicle drivers. In Canada, a company that provides extra-provincial transportation, including its local activities, falls under federal jurisdiction, while a company operating within a province falls under provincial jurisdiction.

For the time being, no changes apply to provincially regulated carriers. Each province will need to adopt the rules based on its specific provincial reality.

Main exemptions

  • short-term rentals, i.e., less than 30 days

  • commercial vehicles built before the year 2000

  • vehicles operated within a 160 km radius from their home terminal, which are not currently required to keep logbooks

  • vehicles operated by a motor carrier to which an exemption has been issued by provincial or federal authorities

What is the effective date?

The federal rule will come into effect on June 12, 2021. However, the Minister of Transport announced in April 2021 that full implementation of the rule by the provinces and territories would not begin in June 2021 as planned. The federal department will work with the provinces to develop a phase-in enforcement plan, which will extend to no later than June 2022. In the meantime, providers must have their ELD tested and certified by an accredited certification body. A list of certified devices will be available and updated on the Transport Canada website. The list can be used by motor carriers to identify certified ELDs and by roadside inspection authorities for verification purposes.

ELD Canada Timeline

Similarities: United States and Canada

Canadian requirements have been aligned with those of the United States to facilitate operations. This will allow carriers to use a single ELD solution in both countries, ensuring that the chosen ELD is approved on both sides of the border.

Among the similarities, here are the main elements that must be well understood by users:

  • Automatic detection of driving status from 8 km/h. When the vehicle is travelling at a speed of 8 km/h or more, the log should automatically display the “driving” status.

  • Automatic return to “on duty” status after a 6-minute stop. After a 5-minute stop, a message must appear on the ELD screen asking the driver if they wish to change their duty status. If the driver does not respond within one minute, the status changes automatically to “on duty” and the elapsed 6 minutes will be registered as driving.

  • “Yard move” feature. Since the ELD indicates the driving status as soon as the vehicle exceeds a speed of 8 km/h, a driver travelling in a customer’s yard can activate the “yard move” mode in order to remain in the “on duty” status, if yard move is authorized by the carrier.

  • Diagnostics and defect management. A diagnostic is a minor problem while a defect signals a major problem. The ELD must, for example, automatically detect an odometer jump, disconnection from the device, etc.

  • Unassigned driving management. When a driver registers in a vehicle, the ELD shows the unassigned driving times that need attention. They must accept or reject them.

  • Change approval by drivers. Drivers will need to approve any changes before they are applied to their logbook.

  • No modification of automatically recorded driving. A driving segment automatically recorded when the vehicle exceeds 8 km/h cannot be shortened. In case of a problem, the driver can annotate the driving segment to explain the situation. The driver can also change other statuses as needed.

Differences: United States and Canada

The two ELD regulations differ. For carriers operating in both countries, it is important to be aware of these distinctions in order to properly train users and avoid errors.

Certification process

In the United States, ELD providers perform self-certification in order to be registered on the FMCSA list (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration). To date, there are nearly 500 devices on this list. To find a supplier, carriers must conduct their search, keeping in mind that their compliance depends on their choice of ELD supplier.

To ensure a higher level of compliance, the Government of Canada has opted for a third-party certification process. This way, ELD providers must pay to have their solution tested and certified by an accredited body. The objective of this approach is to protect carriers by ensuring that an independent authority has validated that ELDs comply with technical requirements and cannot be falsified. There is currently only one accredited certification body: FPInnovations of Pointe-Claire, Quebec.

Use during malfunction

In the event of device failure, the driver’s hours of service can be recorded with an alternate method (usually paper log) for a maximum of 8 days in the U.S. In Canada, the driver may use paper daily logs for a maximum of 14 days or until his return to the home terminal from the current trip, if the trip lasts longer than 14 days. After this period, the ELD must be repaired or replaced and fully functional.

Notification prior to violations

Unlike the U.S. regulations, the Canadian version requires the ELD to notify the driver at least 30 minutes prior to reaching any limit imposed by the current hours of service rules. This is to keep the driver informed and thus avoid violations for the driver and ensure road safety.

Supporting Canadian rules

In Canada, the hours of service rules have more situations and provisions than the U.S. rules. A Canadian ELD must support all of them. Here are the main situations:

– 2 cycles: Cycle 1 (70 hours over 7 days) and Cycle 2 (120 hours over 14 days)

– 2 zones of operation: South of 60th and North of 60th

– Deferral of daily Off-duty time to the following day (day 1 / day 2)

Choosing a partner

If you are subject to the Canadian regulations, consider choosing an ELD provider who will also act as a partner. A solution like ISAAC’s will not only enable your fleet to be compliant in both Canada and the United States but will also optimize your overall operations. Your assigned project manager can help and guide you through the implementation process.

*Last update: May 13, 2021

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  1. Wilf July 15, 2019 at 3:06 pm - Reply

    Are Livestock haulers excempt in Canada the same as in the USA
    Thanks

  2. ISAAC Instruments July 15, 2019 at 3:41 pm - Reply

    Hi! No, there are no exemptions for livestock haulers at the present time.

  3. Gurinder mahal July 25, 2019 at 10:29 pm - Reply

    Canada government should improve the highways and make more proper rest areas make proper washrooms in rest areas the highways in Canada not safe most of the highways in Canada is single lane and Don’t have proper rest areas in winter time roads really bad peoples working for cleaning the highways they not doing their job and trucking companies they don’t paying proper money brokers they take to much commission no one control those people please pay attention those things if truckers make enough money they don’t need to drive the trucks over hours these big companies they don’t like companies those companies working with government to kill the small companies that’s why they want ELD logs and then they want people to treat like slabs

    • Peter Thiessen March 4, 2021 at 11:07 pm - Reply

      In Canada the roadside rest stops are not often enough for ELD. In the winter, it will be a disaster in British Columbia.

  4. D Troy Smith January 27, 2020 at 10:24 am - Reply

    hi my name is Troy, I have a question, I run a tractor and float I am 95 percent of the time within the 160 km radius, but once in a while ill go out of that will I need an e-log system put in the truck I drive ??? thank you

    • ISAAC Instruments January 27, 2020 at 11:05 am - Reply

      Hi Troy!

      Yes. As soon as you exit the 160 km radius, an ELD will be required.

      • Tom marks February 14, 2021 at 12:11 am - Reply

        What if you go past the 160km radius, but stay in your province?

        Aren’t ELD a federal ruling and not provincial.

        • ISAAC Instruments February 15, 2021 at 10:50 am - Reply

          Hi Tom,

          To answer this question, we must look at two aspects.

          First, the ELD rule is a rule that applies to all commercial vehicles that are part of fleets doing inter-provincial transportation. The criterion for determining if a vehicle needs an ELD is: Does this vehicle belong to, or are this vehicle and its driver hired by, a carrier engaged in inter-provincial transportation? It is not sufficient to ask if this one vehicle stays in the province or not. It is essential to know that a fleet is an inter-provincial fleet if at least one vehicle drives outside the province.

          The second part is that different provinces manage inter- and intra-provincial transportation differently. Quebec, for example, does not differentiate inter- and intra-provincial transportation. There is only one rule in Quebec. It applies to all commercial vehicles driving on its roads, regardless of whether they are engaged in inter- or intra-provincial transportation. On the other end, Alberta has one set of rules for inter-provincial transportation and a different set of rules for intra-provincial transportation.

          In conclusion, we can’t give you a definite answer. The only way you would not need an ELD is if your carrier is engaged in intra-provincial transportation in a province, and that province has a set of rules for intra-provincial transportation that does not require an ELD. In all other cases, you would need an ELD.

        • Mike May 27, 2021 at 9:47 am - Reply

          I have 14 trucks that are plated as farm vehicles…..so essentially they are like a tractor….our trucks haul only our produce therefore do not need to be commercially plated or insured like other trucking g companies….now will I have to Install electronic logs in my trucks?

          • ISAAC Instruments May 27, 2021 at 4:24 pm

            Hi Mike,

            There are four (4) exceptions allowing a vehicle not to be equipped with a compliant ELD.

            A motor carrier shall ensure that each commercial vehicle that it operates is equipped with an ELD that meets the requirements of the Technical Standard, and shall ensure that it is mounted in a fixed position during the operation of the commercial vehicle and is visible to the driver when the driver is in the normal driving position, except for commercial vehicles that are:

            – operated by a motor carrier under a permit: this is meant for specific permits issued by Federal, Provincial or Territorial authorities;
            – operated by a motor carrier to which an exemption has been issued under the Act: 160 km radius from home terminal for drivers returning home every night (drivers can continue with their simplified log);
            – the subject of a rental agreement of no longer than 30 days that is not an extended or renewed rental of the same vehicle;
            – manufactured before model year 2000.

            NOTE: This rule covers exemptions for Canadian ELD regulation compliance but does not exempt in any way the driver from completing a logbook when required.

            We invite you to explore our FAQs: https://isaacinstruments.com/en/frequently-asked-questions-about-elds-in-canada/

  5. Wesley Brown July 10, 2020 at 1:16 pm - Reply

    Will a greenhouse operation be exempt if the trucks run farm plates? The flower are sold all over Ontario and moved via rented trucks and owned trucks.

    • ISAAC Instruments July 21, 2020 at 1:05 pm - Reply

      Hi Wesley, ELDs offer a new way of tracking hours of service. If your trucks are currently exempt from having to track HOS, they will likely continue to be exempt when ELDs are enforced in 2021. Of course, there are various factors to take into account. You can find more information here: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/

  6. LeeC July 15, 2020 at 7:20 pm - Reply

    Does changing from a Federal (either North or South) to a Provincial ruleset (and vice versa) require a full cycle reset?

    Does changing from a Federal South to a Provincial ruleset (and vice versa) require an operating zone change?

    • Gust October 21, 2020 at 8:37 pm - Reply

      I am a US driver that drives to Canada daily. I am not required to use an eld in the US because of the new 150 mile rule, am I required to use an eld in Canada because of the 160km(100 mile) rule?

      • ISAAC Instruments October 23, 2020 at 1:52 pm - Reply

        Hello!

        Essentially, you would be exempt from using an ELD if you:
        – drive a commercial vehicle within a radius of 160 km (100 miles) of the home terminal
        – return to the home terminal each day to begin a minimum of 8 consecutive hours of off-duty time;
        – the motor carrier maintains accurate and legible records showing, for each day, the cycle the driver followed and on-duty times and keeps those records and the supporting documents relating to those records for a minimum period of 6 months after the day on which each record was recorded.

        If you go beyond the 100-mile radius, then you would be required to use an ELD to comply with the Canadian HOS rule.

  7. Randi August 26, 2020 at 3:56 pm - Reply

    Is agriculture exempt from the ELD’s?

  8. ISAAC Instruments September 1, 2020 at 9:19 am - Reply

    Hi Randi! ELDs offer a new way of tracking hours of service; they don’t change current HOS rules. If your trucks are currently exempt from having to track HOS, they will likely continue to be exempt when ELDs are enforced in 2021.

  9. Tim September 29, 2020 at 2:20 pm - Reply

    I see comments that highways, rest stops and rest areas/ truck stops need to improve. Very few steering wheel holders actually eat in a truck stop and most all of today’s “Drivers” make a mess of the parking facilities anyway. Why would anybody invest millions for someone to throw their garbage all over the place and piss on the seat and wall?

  10. Tinasha September 29, 2020 at 4:05 pm - Reply

    I have yet to see the list of devices certified by an accredited body. It was suppose to be released in June and its now almost October.
    What companies have Transport Canada approved devices?

    • ISAAC Instruments September 30, 2020 at 8:47 am - Reply

      Hello Tinasha,
      Transport Canada has not yet revealed the accredited certifying body. Then, ELD suppliers will be able to submit their devices for certification.

  11. Bruce October 2, 2020 at 12:40 pm - Reply

    I drive a 1 ton hauling RV’s. I’m exempt with the ELD in the US. Will this be the same in Canada?

    • ISAAC Instruments October 8, 2020 at 12:20 pm - Reply

      Hi Bruce,
      If your truck is currently exempt from having to track HOS with paper logs, they will likely continue to be exempt when ELDs are enforced in 2021.

  12. Sue November 6, 2020 at 9:16 am - Reply

    We are in the Oil & Gas Industry with a Federal Operating Status and have a Special Permit – known as “Federal Oil Well Service Vehicle Cycle Exemption permit for HOS. Does Issac have the software in their program to input this into the Cycle Status area as we don’t fall under the 70/7 Day or 120/14 day rules?

    • ISAAC Instruments November 9, 2020 at 7:59 am - Reply

      Hi!
      We will contact you shortly to discuss your specific situation!
      Thank you

  13. Natasha November 30, 2020 at 5:53 pm - Reply

    I have a question about what 160 km from your home terminal. What defines your home terminal? where the vehicle is started and parked each day or the address on the registration

    For excample:
    We are an Alberta company that has a jobsite in BC. Our trucks can be floated to the job and then stay within the 160km of the job site. Would that prevent the need of installing an ELD?

    • ISAAC Instruments December 1, 2020 at 9:52 am - Reply

      Hi Natasha,
      According to the Canadian Rule, here’s the definition of home terminal:
      home terminal means the place of business of a motor carrier at which a driver ordinarily reports for work and, for the purposes of sections 80 to 82 and Schedule 2, includes a temporary work site designated by the motor carrier.

      Source: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

      Sections 80 to 82 being the sections dealing with local time, the obligation to keep a logbook and the content of the logbook.

      In addition, the section on the 160 km exemption in the Alberta Hours of Service Guide mentions the possibilities and terminal changes.

      Change to Home Terminal
      There are several situations where it is common for a carrier to change the home
      terminal for a driver:

      • In the school bus industry, bus drivers take their bus home and begin
      and end their workday at an “out park” location. An “out park” location
      can be at the driver’s home or a parking place near the home such as
      a farm, school or shopping centre. For these drivers, the “out park”
      location is their home terminal (normal work-reporting location).

      • In the gravel truck industry, city gravel haulers drive out to various rural
      locations and work for 2 – 3 weeks at a time and stay in a hotel. For
      these drivers, the hotel is their home terminal.

      • In the oil / gas service industry, drivers work from a motel for a week or
      so, then change motels to do a different job. For these drivers, the
      motel is their home terminal.

      A motor carrier can change the home terminal for a driver to a new location to
      qualify for the daily log exemption. In these situations, the driver and motor
      carrier must do the following:

      • On the day that the trip from the old location to the new location
      occurs, the driver must record the change in a daily log because the
      driver has not returned to the normal home terminal.
      For example, in the oil / gas service industry on the day(s) that the
      driver is moving to a new motel at a different location, the driver uses a
      daily log to record all duty status activities. Once the driver is
      operating from the new motel, the driver qualifies for the daily log
      exemption again.

      • For the days that the driver qualifies for the daily log exemption, the
      motor carrier must maintain a record of duty status for the driver

      Source: http://www.transportation.alberta.ca/Content/docType276/Production/Module_18.pdf

      We would recommend referring to this 20-page module on the 160 km exemption. It is very detailed and well explained. In addition, there are several useful examples.

      • Scott January 24, 2021 at 11:34 am - Reply

        Has it been defined how many times in a cycle (i.e. 30 days) a driver can go beyond the 160km, such as a change of home terminal, before requiring an ELD? In the US it is 8 days.

        • ISAAC Instruments January 26, 2021 at 12:56 pm - Reply

          Hi Scott,

          In its FAQs, the FMCSA clarified that a driver who uses paper logs for no more than 8 days per 30-day period is exempt from using ELD.
          https://eld.fmcsa.dot.gov/FAQ/SearchFAQs?searchWord=short

          In Canada, no such directive has been issued. Under the Canadian rule, a driver is not required to keep a daily log if he drives a truck within 160 km of the terminal.

          Requirement to Fill Out a Daily Log
          • 81 (1) A motor carrier shall require every driver to fill out and every driver shall fill out a daily log each day that accounts for all of the driver’s on-duty time and off-duty time for that day.
          • (2) This section does not apply if:
          o the driver drives, or is instructed by the motor carrier to drive, a commercial vehicle within a radius of 160 km of the home terminal;
          o […]
          • SOR/2019-165, s. 27
          Source : https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

          If a driver is required to keep a daily log when he was not required to do so immediately prior to the start of the day, he must document the on- and off-duty hours for the last 14 days in the Remarks section.

          Content of Daily Logs
          • 82 (1) At the beginning of each day, a motor carrier shall require that a driver enters legibly, and the driver shall enter legibly, the following information in a daily log, using the grid in the form as set out in Schedule 2:
          o […]
          o (f) in the “Remarks” section of the daily log, if the driver was not required to keep a daily log immediately before the beginning of the day, the number of hours of off-duty time and on-duty time that were accumulated by the driver each day during the 14 days immediately before the beginning of the day.
          o […]
          • SOR/2019-165, s. 28
          Source: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

          Furthermore, the ELD standard requires an ELD device to have a function to enter on-duty and off-duty hours for a driver who is required to keep a daily log but was not required to do so immediately prior to the start of the day.

          4.3.2.2.4 Indication of Situations Impacting duty-/driving-hour limitations
          […]
          c) An ELD must provide the means to indicate additional hours that were not recorded for the current motor carrier during the current day or the required previous days specified in current HOS regulations:
          (1) When this function is selected, the ELD must prompt the user to select one of the following options:
          […]
          ii. Option 2: additional hours not recorded since the driver was not required to keep a RODS immediately before the beginning of the day.
          […]
          Source: https://ccmta.ca/images/pdf-documents-english/cra/eld/FINAL_ELD_TECHNICAL_STANDARD_V1.2_ENGLISH_10-27-2020.pdf

          In conclusion, seeing the structure of the rule on daily logs, the absence of a directive similar to that of the U.S. and the presence of an ELD function specifically for cases of drivers going outside the 160 km radius, a driver going outside the 160 km radius must use an ELD.

  14. Kurt December 19, 2020 at 11:51 pm - Reply

    I drive for a company that operates in the US and Canada. The company operates 6 trucks that are post 2000 model year, but each truck has a pre 2000 model year engine. Do these trucks qualify for the exemption from ELD requirements in Canada?

    • ISAAC Instruments January 4, 2021 at 7:34 am - Reply

      Hello Kurt,
      The regulation as currently written only exempts commercial vehicles manufactured before model year 2000. There is no exception or guidance as in the U.S. to exempt vehicles manufactured after model year 2000 but with an engine manufactured before year 2000.

  15. Jim January 9, 2021 at 1:34 am - Reply

    How do the eld rules apply to winter road operations in Ontario and Manitoba? We already have special permits that modify hours of service. Will qualifying trucks be required to be equipped with an eld? My fleet only operates during winter road season but we are an irp registered carrier operating in Canada only.
    Can you shed some light on this situation? We haven’t been able to get any answers from the authorities on this.

    • ISAAC Instruments January 12, 2021 at 10:35 am - Reply

      Hello Jim,
      Here’s what the Canadian hours of service regulations say about ELDs:

      ELD Records of Duty Status
      Electronic Logging Device

      • 77 (1) A motor carrier shall ensure that each commercial vehicle that it operates is equipped with an ELD that meets the requirements of the Technical Standard, and shall ensure that it is mounted in a fixed position during the operation of the commercial vehicle and is visible to the driver when the driver is in the normal driving position, with the exception of commercial vehicles that are:

      o (a) operated by a motor carrier under a permit;
      o (b) operated by a motor carrier to which an exemption has been issued under the Act;
      o (c) the subject of a rental agreement of no longer than 30 days that is not an extended or renewed rental of the same vehicle; or
      o (d) manufactured before model year 2000.

      Source: Commercial Vehicle Drivers Hours of Service Regulation (https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html)

      In your case, we would suggest that you contact your provincial ministry of transportation for more information. On the Ontario Northern Winter Roads web page, there is a contact for this topic. This person would probably be able to provide more details.

      Sherry Werner
      Tel: (905) 704-2974 | Fax: (905) 704-2039
      Email: sherry.werner@ontario.ca

  16. Kevin February 9, 2021 at 11:30 pm - Reply

    A provincial carrier in Alberta will they have to use eld most times were in the 160 but make a few trips a year 500 km

    • ISAAC Instruments February 10, 2021 at 8:57 am - Reply

      Hi Kevin,

      If you go beyond the 160-km radius, then you would be required to use an ELD to comply with the Canadian HOS rule.

  17. Rob Rogers February 24, 2021 at 12:08 pm - Reply

    I’m a Canadian travelling into the u.s.
    in the u.s. I don’t need an eld unless I go over the 150 air miles.. 8x in 30 days
    Since I’m in bc do I still require an eld or would I be exempt cuz it’s not needed in the USA

    • ISAAC Instruments March 3, 2021 at 1:27 pm - Reply

      Hi Rob,

      In its FAQs, the FMCSA clarified that a driver who uses paper logs for no more than 8 days per 30-day period is exempt from using ELD.
      https://eld.fmcsa.dot.gov/FAQ/SearchFAQs?searchWord=short

      In Canada, no such directive has been issued. Under the Canadian rule, a driver is not required to keep a daily log if he drives a truck within 160 km of the terminal.

      Requirement to Fill Out a Daily Log
      • 81 (1) A motor carrier shall require every driver to fill out and every driver shall fill out a daily log each day that accounts for all of the driver’s on-duty time and off-duty time for that day.
      • (2) This section does not apply if:
      o the driver drives, or is instructed by the motor carrier to drive, a commercial vehicle within a radius of 160 km of the home terminal;
      o […]
      • SOR/2019-165, s. 27
      Source : https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

      Under the current regulation, if a driver is required to keep a daily log when he was not required to do so immediately prior to the start of the day, he must document the on- and off-duty hours for the last 14 days in the Remarks section.

      Content of Daily Logs
      • 82 (1) At the beginning of each day, a motor carrier shall require that a driver enters legibly, and the driver shall enter legibly, the following information in a daily log, using the grid in the form as set out in Schedule 2:
      o […]
      o (f) in the “Remarks” section of the daily log, if the driver was not required to keep a daily log immediately before the beginning of the day, the number of hours of off-duty time and on-duty time that were accumulated by the driver each day during the 14 days immediately before the beginning of the day.
      o […]
      • SOR/2019-165, s. 28
      Source: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

      Furthermore, the ELD standard requires an ELD device to have a function to enter on-duty and off-duty hours for a driver who is required to keep a daily log but was not required to do so immediately prior to the start of the day.

      4.3.2.2.4 Indication of Situations Impacting duty-/driving-hour limitations
      […]
      c) An ELD must provide the means to indicate additional hours that were not recorded for the current motor carrier during the current day or the required previous days specified in current HOS regulations:
      (1) When this function is selected, the ELD must prompt the user to select one of the following options:
      […]
      ii. Option 2: additional hours not recorded since the driver was not required to keep a RODS immediately before the beginning of the day.
      […]
      Source: https://ccmta.ca/images/pdf-documents-english/cra/eld/FINAL_ELD_TECHNICAL_STANDARD_V1.2_ENGLISH_10-27-2020.pdf

      In conclusion, seeing the structure of the rule on daily logs, the absence of a directive similar to that of the U.S. and the presence of an ELD function specifically for cases of drivers going outside the 160 km radius, a driver going outside the 160 km radius must use an ELD.

  18. Dale February 28, 2021 at 1:53 pm - Reply

    Have not been able to find CLEAR info in regards to agricultural commodities !! I have my own truck and only haul my own ag commodities , in this case it is livestock feed !! I do go out of my 160km zone but I do this because I have secured a consistent yearly supply of feed at a very reasonable cost !! If I could find a CONSISTENT YEARLY feed supply within 160km of home I would take it in a heart beat , a lot of times Mother Nature has a lot to say about it(ie;NO RAIN) !! I do fill out paper logs because of the 160km zone now , but will I have to install an ELD being that my 2007 truck is farm plated only and am only hauling my own ag commodity ??

    • ISAAC Instruments March 4, 2021 at 8:05 am - Reply

      Hi Dale,

      It is difficult to answer this question without knowing more about your specific case. The Canadian ELD rule says that ELDs will be mandatory for all trucks except commercial vehicles that are:

      (a) operated by a motor carrier under a permit;

      (b) operated by a motor carrier to which an exemption has been issued under the Act;

      (c) the subject of a rental agreement of no longer than 30 days that is not an extended or renewed rental of the same vehicle; or

      (d) manufactured before model year 2000.

      Source: SOR-2005-313, 77(1) https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

      If you have a permit, either a Special Permit, a Permit for Commercial Vehicles Other than Oil Well Service Vehicles, or an Oil Well Service Vehicle Permits, you would be exempt from using an ELD. The second type of permit is issued by provincial governments and seems to fit your type of operation. We would advise that you reach out to your provincial authorities to validate the requirement to use an ELD considering your farm-plated truck.

  19. JOHN TINDALL March 11, 2021 at 11:59 am - Reply

    I have a farm plated one tonne dually that I use to haul my own agricultural products. I go outside the 160km limit periodically. I use this truck for the farm about 30% of the time. The rest of the time it is used for personal use. I am licenced for 11000kg and fill out paper logs. Do I need an ELD?

    • ISAAC Instruments March 12, 2021 at 12:26 pm - Reply

      Hi John,

      It is difficult to answer this question without knowing more about your specific case. The Canadian ELD rule says that ELDs will be mandatory for all trucks except commercial vehicles that are:

      (a) operated by a motor carrier under a permit;
      (b) operated by a motor carrier to which an exemption has been issued under the Act;
      (c) the subject of a rental agreement of no longer than 30 days that is not an extended or renewed rental of the same vehicle; or
      (d) manufactured before model year 2000.

      Source: SOR-2005-313, 77(1) https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html

      If you have a permit, either a Special Permit, a Permit for Commercial Vehicles Other than Oil Well Service Vehicles, or an Oil Well Service Vehicle Permits, you would be exempt from using an ELD. The second type of permit is issued by provincial governments and seems to fit your type of operation. We would advise that you reach out to your provincial authorities to validate the requirement to use an ELD considering your farm-plated truck.

  20. ryan wood March 16, 2021 at 2:37 pm - Reply

    hi, i operate a 1 ton dually car hauler. i am in ontario. currently i am licensed at 14,000 kgs with prp plates and ifta sticker. i am thinking about dropping the prp and ifta, and only run ontario, if i will not need a eld??? from what i have read, is this the case? i will be travelling outside my 160 kms radius. thank you, ryan

    • ISAAC Instruments May 3, 2021 at 10:02 am - Reply

      Hi Ryan,

      Transport Canada (TC) amended the Federal HoS Regulations to mandate ELDs for all federally regulated commercial truck and bus operators. The Canadian ELD rule says that ELDs will be mandatory for all trucks except commercial vehicles that are:

      (a) operated by a motor carrier under a permit;
      (b) operated by a motor carrier to which an exemption has been issued under the Act;
      (c) the subject of a rental agreement of no longer than 30 days that is not an extended or renewed rental of the same vehicle; or
      (d) manufactured before model year 2000.

      The Ontario government introduced Bill 223, which, if passed, will amend the Highway Traffic Act to adopt the same changes as outlined in TC’s requirements, including mandating the use of ELDs for intra-provincial carriers.
      TC’s new requirements will apply to Ontario carriers who travel outside of Ontario. If approved, Ontario is proposing similar changes for carriers that operated in Ontario only (intra-provincial carriers).

      We would advise that you reach out to your provincial authorities to validate the requirement to use an ELD.

      Sources:
      SOR-2005-313, 77(1) https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-313/FullText.html
      https://www.ontariocanada.com/registry/view.do?postingId=35067&language=en

  21. Yogesh Murali April 29, 2021 at 2:57 pm - Reply

    My company has 30 service vehicles, ranging from sprinter vans to Hino 16ft units. The trucks are just used for roadside assistance and maintenance. The drivers only do a vehicle inspection and they have never logged their hours of service previously. Do we need to get ELD with this new mandate? The exceptions listed are not very clear in terms of service vehicles are exempt or not.

    • ISAAC Instruments April 30, 2021 at 10:59 am - Reply

      Hi,
      The ELD rule only applies to Commercial Motor Vehicles (CMV), as described in the Commercial Vehicle Drivers Hours of Service Regulations. Only vehicles above 4 500 kg of Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) are considered CMVs. As you are using light vehicles, some of your vehicles might fall outside this criterion and would be exempt from the requirement to use an ELD.

      If your vehicles are CMVs, but you remain within a 160 km radius from your home terminal at all time, then you do not need to use an Electronic Logging Device or ELD. However, if you travel outside a 160 km radius from your home terminal, you must transition to an ELD. The regulatory changes are mainly intended to replace paper logbooks with electronic logs. As such, in most cases, a driver exempt from the requirement to keep a logbook would be exempt from the requirement to use an ELD.

  22. Peter May 26, 2021 at 1:40 pm - Reply

    Is the cut off the year of the truck or the year of the motor? Example early 2000 truck factory engine is a 1999

    • ISAAC Instruments May 26, 2021 at 1:54 pm - Reply

      Hello Peter,
      The regulation as currently written exempts commercial vehicles manufactured before model year 2000. There is no exception or guidance as in the U.S. to exempt vehicles manufactured after model year 2000 but with an engine manufactured before year 2000.

  23. Robin May 27, 2021 at 5:44 pm - Reply

    Hello, If a driver is parked in a parking lot and in sleeper berth and is awaken and told he needs to move his truck. Does he need to disrupt his sleeper berth? or is there a status he can do the move to the other side of the parking lot and not disrupt his status? As going on duty to change his status could affect his entire day. Thank you.

    • ISAAC Instruments